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Partnership

Disclosure Services & The British Association of Removers

 
Disclosure Services are proud to partner with the British Association of Removers (BAR), the trade association for the removal industry that for over 100 years has set professional standards and provided expert training for the removal industry while offering professional information, advice and a dispute resolution service to residential consumers.
 

About Disclosure Services

 
Since 2002 Disclosure Services has been processing electronic criminal records checks and assisting a comprehensive range of organisations to make informed recruitment decisions, fulfilling regulatory and compliance requirements, mitigating risk to clients, service users and employees.
 

Latest News


Forthcoming Infrastructure Upgrades

31 July 2017

In order to maintain robust and comprehensive systems, Disclosure Services are undertaking a major investment in infrastructure for our systems and services.

We're commencing implementation from 1st August 2017 and you may notice small changes to how our Invoices look when you receive them.

We will keep you updated of further system and operational improvements.


Guidance: Quality assurance framework, version 9 (QAF v9)

2014-01-22T12:37:00+00:00

Updated: Various Quality Assurance Framework (QAF) attachments updated with newer versions.

QAF version 9 was developed to support the DBS Update Service. QAF version 9 is built upon the foundations of version 8, which reflected the changes brought about by the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012.

Version 9 also includes process maps and general guidance for considering offences which may be removed by the filtering of ‘old and minor’ convictions, cautions, reprimands and warnings.


Collection: Migration transparency data

2014-05-23T10:01:00+01:00

Updated: Updated migration transparency data collection.

These documents include performance data related to areas in the Home Office business plan.

These documents also include data on borders and immigration activity which has been regularly requested from the Home Office by the Home Affairs Select Committee.

Also included alongside this quarter’s publication is data relating to the number of children transferred to the UK during the UK’s comprehensive support to the clearance of the Calais camp, following a request from the French government in October 2016.

General statistics on immigration are in the Migration statistics collection.


News story: Basic disclosure changes

2017-11-24T15:07:29+00:00

Basic disclosure check changes

From January 2018, if you need a basic disclosure check for a job in England and Wales, you should apply to the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). If you need a basic disclosure check for a job in Scotland, then you should apply to Disclosure Scotland. If you want a check for personal reasons rather than work purposes, you should apply where you live – DBS if you live in England or Wales or Disclosure Scotland if you live in Scotland.

If you are applying to DBS you will be able to use our new online application route that will be available on www.gov.uk. Alternatively, you can use a ‘Responsible Organisation’ (RO) – a third party registered with DBS – to submit checks on your behalf. A list of Responsible Organisations can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/responsible-organisations.

Responsible Organisations

Organisations that can demonstrate that they can submit a minimum of 1000 basic checks a year, meet our processing standards and agree to the Terms & Conditions https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/basic-check-guidance-and-policies will be able to apply to become an RO and build a web service. If you are eligible and thinking about becoming a RO please email customerservices@dbs.gsi.gov.uk to find out more.

DBS has already increased staffing levels to deal with the additional checks. Those organisations that have already transferred their basic disclosure checks to DBS are already benefiting from a speedy service, with checks taking on average less than one day to process.

Individuals and ROs should send basic disclosure checks to the right organisation, DBS or Disclosure Scotland, so that the correct Rehabilitation of Offender (ROA) rules are applied. There is a risk of legal action if incorrect ROA rules are applied and impact a recruitment decision.

For any enquiries please contact customerservices@dbs.gsi.gov.uk.


Detailed guide: Responsible Organisations

2017-09-04T10:00:00+01:00

Updated: New Responsible Organisations added.

A Responsible Organisation (RO) is an organisation registered with the DBS to submit basic checks through a web service.

Responsibilities of a Responsible Organisation (RO)

An RO will capture the details of a basic check application in their system before transferring it to DBS via a web service. You can apply for basic checks with DBS by visiting the website of a Responsible Organisation.

An RO is responsible for confirming that:

  • information supplied in each application for a basic check has been checked in line with DBS identity guidance
  • the information provided in support of the basic check is complete and true
  • the applicant has provided consent to submit the application
  • they will pay DBS for basic checks that have been sent to us

Each RO must agree to DBS Terms and Conditions meet our processing standards and have a nominated accountable officer.

Responsible Organisations providing basic check services through DBS

Responsible Organisation Name Website
Access Personal Checking Services Ltd (APCS) www.criminalrecordchecks.co.uk
CRB Disclosure Services Ltd T/A Disclosure Services www.disclosureservices.com
uCheck www.ucheck.co.uk
Northgate HR PeopleChecking www.peoplechecking.com
Staffvetting.com Limited www.staffvetting.com
Verifile www.verifile.co.uk
Vero Screening www.veroscreening.com

The list of Responsible Organisations who are registered with the DBS will be updated regularly.


Collection: DBS barring referral guidance

2013-08-28T12:37:00+01:00

Updated: A new link has been added to the contents (Register for a digital account), to enable users to register for a DBS online services account.

DBS caseworkers make decisions about who should be placed in the child barred list and/or adults barred list and are prevented by law from working with children or vulnerable groups.

Referrals should be made to DBS when an employer or organisation believes a person has caused harm or poses a future risk of harm to vulnerable groups, including children.

An employer or volunteer manager is breaking the law if they knowingly employ someone in a regulated activity with a group from which they are barred from working.

A barred person is breaking the law if they seek, offer or engage in regulated activity with a group from which they are barred from working.

If you don’t need detailed guidance you can read the quick guide about DBS barred lists.


Detailed guide: Making barring referrals to the DBS

2016-03-04T12:04:00+00:00

Updated: One of the headings has been changed to highlight which section of the guidance users need to view in order to register for a DBS online services account.

Introduction

Advice about when employers and volunteer managers can make a barring referral to the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS).

This guide is not legal advice and doesn’t cover all aspects or examples of harm, referrals and barring. If you need legal assistance, you should speak with a legal advisor.

What is a referral?

A referral is information about a person. It tells us of concerns that an individual may have harmed a child or vulnerable adult, or put a child or vulnerable adult at risk of harm.

The referral duty doesn’t apply to family or personal arrangements, parents or members of the public. If a parent or member of the public has a safeguarding concern, they should contact the police, social services or the person’s employer.

These agencies can then investigate the allegation and if appropriate make a referral to the DBS.

When a person has been referred, DBS consider if they need to be added to a barred list(s).

You can look at the referral flowchart to help you decide if you need to make a referral.

Who can make a referral?

Under legislation, the following can make referrals to the DBS:

  • local authorities
  • education authority in Northern Ireland
  • health and social care bodies in Northern Ireland
  • keepers of register in England, Wales or Northern Ireland
  • supervisory authorities in England, Wales or Northern Ireland
  • and

The power to refer happens when an organisation is not acting as a regulated activity provider. This will usually be when the organisation is undertaking their safeguarding role.

The power to refer can be used when an organisation thinks a person has either:

  • harmed or poses a risk of harm to a child or vulnerable adult
  • has satisfied the harm test; or
  • has received a caution or conviction for a relevant offence and;
  • the person they’re referring is, has or might in future be working in regulated activity and;
  • the DBS may consider it appropriate for the person to be added to a barred list

Information about regulated activity

Guidance about regulated activity with children and regulated activity with adults is available. There is also guidance on supervision when working in regulated activity with children.

Northern Ireland also have guidance in relation to regulated activity with adults.

Regulated activity providers (employers or volunteer managers of people working in regulated activity in England, Wales and Northern Ireland) and personnel suppliers have a legal duty to refer to DBS where conditions are met. This applies even when a referral has also been made to a local authority safeguarding team or professional regulator.

A personnel supplier may be an employment agency, employment business or an educational institution and are described as:

  • an employment agency that makes arrangements to either find a work-seeker employment with a hirer or to supply him to a hirer to employ
  • an employment business that engages a work-seeker and supplies him to a hirer to work under a hirer’s control
  • an educational institution if it makes arrangements to supply a student following a course at the institution to a regulated activity provider such as a school.

If you are a regulated activity provider or fall within the category of personnel supplier, you must make a referral when both of the following conditions have been met:

Condition 1

  • you withdraw permission for a person to engage in regulated activity with children and/or vulnerable adults. Or you move the person to another area of work that isn’t regulated activity.

This includes situations when you would have taken the above action, but the person was re-deployed, resigned, retired, or left. For example, a teacher resigns when an allegation of harm to a student is first made.

Condition 2

You think the person has carried out 1 of the following:

  • engaged in relevant conduct in relation to children and/or adults. An action or inaction has harmed a child or vulnerable adult or put them at risk or harm or;
  • satisfied the harm test in relation to children and / or vulnerable adults. eg there has been no relevant conduct but a risk of harm to a child or vulnerable still exists.or
  • been cautioned or convicted of a relevant (automatic barring either with or without the right to make representations ) offence

Relevant conduct in relation to children

A child is a person under 18 years of age.

Relevant conduct is:

  • endangers a child or is likely to endanger a child
  • if repeated against or in relation to a child would endanger the child or be likely to endanger the child
  • involves sexual material relating to children (including possession of such material)
  • involves sexually explicit images depicting violence against human beings (including possession of such images)
  • is of a sexual nature involving a child

A person’s conduct endangers a child if they:

  • harm a child
  • cause a child to be harmed
  • put a child at risk of harm
  • attempt to harm a child
  • incite another to harm a child

Look at a list of examples of harm to children (PDF, 57.6KB, 2 pages) .

Relevant conduct in relation to adults:

A vulnerable adult is a person aged 18 years or over who is being provided with, or getting a service or assistance which is classed as regulated activity for adults.

Relevant conduct is:

  • endangers a vulnerable adult or is likely to endanger a vulnerable adult
  • if repeated against or in relation to a vulnerable adult would endanger the vulnerable adult or be likely to endanger the vulnerable adult
  • involves sexual material relating to children (including possession of such material)
  • involves sexually explicit images depicting violence against human beings (including possession of such images)
  • is of a sexual nature involving a vulnerable adult

A person’s conduct endangers a vulnerable adult if they:

  • harm a vulnerable adult
  • cause a vulnerable adult to be harmed
  • put a vulnerable adult at risk of harm
  • attempt to harm a vulnerable adult
  • incite another to harm a vulnerable adult

A person satisfies the harm test if they may:

  • harm a vulnerable adult
  • cause a vulnerable adult to be harmed
  • put a vulnerable adult at risk of harm
  • attempt to harm a vulnerable adult
  • incite another to harm a vulnerable adult

Look at a list of examples of harm to vulnerable adults (PDF, 56.3KB, 1 page) .

What is harm?

This is not defined in legislation. DBS view harm as its common understanding or the definition you may find in a dictionary.

Harm is considered in its widest context and may include:

  • sexual harm
  • physical harm
  • financial harm
  • neglect
  • emotional harm
  • psychological harm
  • verbal harm

This is not a fully comprehensive list, harm can take many different forms.

What is the harm test?

A person satisfies the harm test if they may harm a child or vulnerable adult or put them at risk of harm. It is something a person may do to cause harm or pose a risk of harm to a child or vulnerable adult.

Must I make a referral?

If you engaged a person to work in regulated activity, you have a legal duty to refer where the relevant conditions are met.

The duty to refer applies even when a report has been made to another body such as a local authority safeguarding team.

The duty to refer applies irrespective of whether another body has made a referral to the DBS in relation to the same person.

This helps to make sure the DBS have all the relevant information to consider a case. DBS can then make a fair, consistent and thorough decision about whether to bar a person from working with vulnerable groups.

A person who is under a duty to refer and fails to refer to us without reasonable justification is committing an offence. If convicted they may be subject to a fine up to £5,000.

There could be times when you consider that you should make a referral in the interests of safeguarding children or vulnerable adults even if you have not removed the person from working in regulated activity.

This could include acting on advice of the police or a safeguarding professional, or in situations where you don’t have enough evidence to dismiss or remove a person from working with vulnerable groups.

DBS are required by law to consider any and all information sent to us from any source. This includes information sent to us where the legal referral conditions are not met.

DBS will use legal powers and barring processes to determine whether the person should be barred from working in regulated activity with children and / or vulnerable adults.

If you want to make a referral to us where the referral conditions are not met, you should do so in consideration of relevant employment and data protection laws.

You may want to seek your own legal advice in relation to these cases.

Referrals for automatic barring offences

Anyone convicted or cautioned for certain serious offences will, subject to the consideration of representations where permitted, be barred from working in regulated activity with children and/or vulnerable adults.

How to make a referral

We accept referrals made using our online referral form or by post (paper).

Either way you’ll be asked to provide prescribed information. This is information that you must legally provide, if you’re under a duty to refer or if you fall within those persons/bodies who are legally required to provide information on request. You should be aware that the legal duty to provide prescribed information may apply whether you’ve made a referral to the DBS or not.

It’s important that you provide us with as much relevant information as you can. DBS rely on the quality of information provided to us. You’re not expected to provide information that you don’t have access to. As part of the process to decide if an individual should be placed on a barred list, any information in your referral may be used by us and could be disclosed to the referred person or other parties.

You can read more about what we do with your information in our data protection and security guide.

Online referral form and registering for a digital account

We recommend making a referral to DBS using our online referral form. To do this you’ll need to register for a DBS online services account, which will enable us to engage and communicate with you more securely.

To register for a DBS online services account:

  • click ‘Register’ in the top right corner
  • click ‘Create an Individual Account’
  • follow the on screen instructions

Once logged into your DBS online services select the ‘Submit a referral’ option in the Services menu, on the left side of the screen.

Our online form makes it faster and easier for you to send a referral to us. You can:

  • save your referral and complete it later (draft forms are saved for 10 days before being removed)
  • upload electronic documents in support of your referral (subject to technical limitations)
  • use the same form to refer multiple individuals involved in the same incident
  • use the additional attachments space at the end of part 3 if you want to include more than one attachment for each question or if you have any other relevant information to support your referral

Each individual question allows a single document to be attached, which must be less than 10MB and can only be one of the following file types: .jpg, .tiff, .doc, .docx, .xls, .xlsx, .odt, .pdf, .txt.

You can still send us paper documents, or information on digital media (USB or CD/DVD only) if you need to. Any information you attach to the online referral form or send via digital media should be free from password protection or encryption and will be scanned for malware. Where any malware is found you will be asked to resubmit a “clean” version of the information.

Paper referral form (post)

Alternatively, you can complete the DBS paper referral form and read the guidance with it. The paper referral form should be posted to the DBS, with all of the information that has been requested on the form.

Please send any paper referral forms to DBS Barring, PO Box 3963, Royal Wootton Bassett, SN4 4HH.

We cannot guarantee the security of information until it is in our possession, and will not take responsibility for such information until we receive it. For this reason we recommend submitting referrals via our secure online referral form, however if you are using a paper referral form we recommend using registered post.

Should I make a referral when an allegation is first made, or when I temporarily suspend someone?

When an allegation is made, you should investigate and gather enough evidence to establish if it has foundation.

This will inform your processes for any decision to dismiss or remove the person from working in regulated activity.

You should make a referral even if a significant period of time has passed between the allegation and the gathering of evidence to support a decision to make a referral.

You should complete your investigations and disciplinary processes (even if the person has left your employment).

This is particularly important as DBS rely on referral evidence and any other relevant evidence gathered.

The duty to make a referral may not be triggered by temporary suspension, it depends if you have sufficient information to meet the referral duty criteria. You may suspend a person pending an investigation where there have been allegations of harm or risk of harm.

Following investigation, if you decide to let the person return to a position working in regulated activity with children or vulnerable adults then there may not be a legal duty to make a referral.

But, if you decide to dismiss the person or remove them from working in regulated activity then you would need to make a referral.

Will I be informed of the outcome of my referral?

Only if you can prove a legitimate interest in the person you have referred.

If you no longer employ the referred person or let them engage in regulated activity, then you may not be able to show a legitimate interest and won’t be advised of the outcome.

Help with referrals

You can call us on 03000 200 190 if you need help or advice.


Corporate report: DBS annual report and accounts: 2016 to 2017

2017-11-16T16:06:19+00:00

A summary of the activities of the DBS and its financial statements from 1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017.


Guidance: Basic check guidance and policies

2017-09-04T10:00:00+01:00

Updated: Welsh translations added for the Privacy Policy for Accountable Officers and Responsible Organisations, and for the Privacy Policy for applicants.

These documents are for Responsible Organisations who submit basic checks to DBS. Details of documents needed to verify a person’s identity are provided in the basic check identity guidance (above).

Responsible Organisations who submit basic checks to DBS on behalf of individuals will need to comply with these terms and conditions, policies and guidance.


News story: Changes to identity checking guidelines

2017-10-25T12:38:32+01:00

New ID checking guidelines are being introduced on 24 October 2017. These guidelines will apply to all applications for standard or enhanced checks.

The new guidelines will run in parallel with the existing guidelines from 24 October 2017 to 25 January 2018, when the existing guidelines will cease to apply.

We appreciate that you’ll need to make changes to relevant literature and inform your customers. Therefore, you can start using the new guidance from 24 October 2017, but have 3 months to transition fully to the new guidance.

The enhancement is being introduced so that DBS’s identity checking process is aligned with right to work checks. These state that employers must prevent illegal working in the UK by carrying out document checks on people before employing them to make sure they are allowed to work.


Guidance: DBS ID checking guidelines

2012-11-19T00:00:00+00:00

Updated: New guidelines regarding DBS identity (ID) checking to be used from 24 October 2017. These guidelines are to replace the guidelines published on 02 October 2017.

Organisations registered with us need to check the identity of a DBS check applicant as part of the application process. A slightly different process is also part of a countersignatory or lead countersignatory application.

We have two guidance documents to help with each identity check:

  1. ID checking guidelines for DBS check applicants
  2. ID checking guidelines for countersignatory and lead countersignatory applicants

From 8 June 2015, the paper counterpart to the photocard driving licence will not be valid and will no longer be issued by DVLA. Paper driving licences issued before the photocard was introduced in 1998 will remain valid and should not be destroyed.

For the DBS ID checking process this means that just the driving licence photocard needs to be checked, unless an old style paper driving licence is produced (pre-1998).

You can read about the DVLA changes in our news story.